Flag-Waving in Taiwan

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 4, 2003 | Go to article overview

Flag-Waving in Taiwan


Byline: James Morrison, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Flag-waving in Taiwan

In Taiwan yesterday, a Fourth of July celebration came a day early and 24 years late.

U.S. envoy Douglas Paal hosted the Independence Day reception complete with an American flag projected on a large screen in a break with diplomatic protocol established in 1979 when the United States recognized communist China and cut formal relations with Taiwan.

"It's just a very natural thing for Americans to get together," he told the Associated Press in the capital, Taipei. "Our mutual democratic values and desire to achieve peace and prosperity make cooperation between us as natural as the waters flowing from Taiwan's beautiful mountains."

The American Institute in Taiwan, often called the unofficial U.S. Embassy, has not publicly celebrated U.S. holidays or flown the flag in more than two decades. The policy was designed to placate China, which claims Taiwan as a province and strongly opposes any diplomatic recognition of the island.

Taiwan Prime Minister Yu Shyi-kun, who represented the government at the reception, said the celebration is a sign of improving relations under the Bush administration.

"This is conducive to enhancing bilateral exchanges and friendship," he told AP.

The Polish view

The Polish ambassador is confident that the United States and European nations that opposed the war in Iraq will soon get over the diplomatic dispute because Europe and America share the same history and destiny.

"We think very strongly that America is a European power," said Ambassador Przemyslaw Grudzinski. "America is part of our European experience and a part of our past and a part of our present and part of our future. We need America as much as America needs Europe."

Poland was among many European nations that supported the United States, while France and Germany were among the few, but vocal, opponents.

"I think that the fundamentals of this relationship have not changed, and in time it will be possible to reconcile the difference, heal some wounds and to move forward," he told the Voice of America's "On the Line" television show last month.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Flag-Waving in Taiwan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.