N.Y. Mayor Overhauls Bilingual Education; Bloomberg's Plan Has Students Taking Courses in First Language and English

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 8, 2003 | Go to article overview

N.Y. Mayor Overhauls Bilingual Education; Bloomberg's Plan Has Students Taking Courses in First Language and English


Byline: Liz Trotta, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

NEW YORK - Bilingual education in the city's public schools, judged a failure by just about every study and standard, has always served as a political trap waiting for unwary politicians in this city of immigrants.

So when as a mayoral candidate Michael R. Bloomberg declared himself an advocate of English-only education, parent groups and conservative educators held their breath.

Once elected, it did not take long for Mr. Bloomberg, a lifelong Democrat who gained a ballot position by turning Republican, to realize his mistake. Faced with plummeting popularity ratings, especially among Hispanics, the mayor reversed course and announced that more teachers and materials are the answer to creating a successful bilingual education program.

As part of a heralded makeover of the city's public schools system, the administration has committed $20 million to the program, which allows students to take their core academic courses in their native tongue whether it is Spanish, Haitian or Chinese while taking English courses.

"I've been in the business of bilingual education for a long time, and this is first time I feel that the mayor has a plan based on education, not politics," said Lorraine Cortes-Vazquez, president of the Hispanic Federation, an organization of social service groups.

"Now we can talk about merits rather than whether it's anti-American and anti-patriotic," she added. "An insufficient number of trained teachers and the poorest resources have handicapped the program from the start."

The rationale for bilingual education as opposed to English "immersion," in which students must take all their courses in English rests on the argument that students will perform poorly without a gradual introduction of English into all study courses.

Mrs. Cortes-Vazquez is typical of the entrenched interests that have made bilingual education a virtual untouchable issue. In a city overwhelmingly in favor of liberal Democrats who favor spending on social programs, rare is the voice raised against this program. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

N.Y. Mayor Overhauls Bilingual Education; Bloomberg's Plan Has Students Taking Courses in First Language and English
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.