Why Your Teen Should Study a Foreign Language

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 6, 2003 | Go to article overview

Why Your Teen Should Study a Foreign Language


Byline: Rose Rennekamp

Not long ago, a friend's son was trying to explain why he didn't want to take a foreign language in high school.

He just didn't see the point. He wanted to be a structural engineer when he graduated from college and couldn't see the benefit of studying something that he was sure he wasn't going to use. What he didn't understand was that the study of foreign languages is beneficial to all students, no matter what they are planning to do in the future. They can learn a number of skills that can benefit them both inside and outside of the classroom.

More and more, learning other languages is not only smart, it's essential. ACT suggests high school students complete two years in the same foreign language; for example, Spanish I and Spanish II.

Many colleges include foreign language credits as part of their admission requirements. Contrary to some students' beliefs, studying a foreign language isn't just another hoop they have to jump through to get into college. It shows the college that they have skills necessary for academic success.

Foreign language study has been shown to increase students' academic skills in other areas. For example, by learning the grammatical rules of another language, students often learn more about the structure of their own languages. Studying other languages also enhances students' skills in problem solving, oral communication and cross-cultural understanding. In fact, a recent study found that students who had completed a foreign language course in high school, no matter what their ability levels in that language, had higher scores on the ACT assessments in English and mathematics.

Students can learn several important cultural skills by studying other languages.

In a nation that is becoming more and more ethnically diverse, understanding other cultures is very important. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Why Your Teen Should Study a Foreign Language
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.