Black College Queens: Proud, Smart and Compassionate, These Young Women Epitomize the Best Collegians of the '90S

Ebony, April 1991 | Go to article overview

Black College Queens: Proud, Smart and Compassionate, These Young Women Epitomize the Best Collegians of the '90S


Black COLLEGE Queens

THEY represent the best of the collegians of the '90s: proud, ambitious and astute. Yet, the 89 women who are on this year's list of Black Campus Queens not only use their talents to further their own goals but also to help others.

Those qualities distinguish the 1991 Black Campus Queens from other coeds, whether they represent a historically Black college or university or a predominantly White institution.

Neither the type nor size of school is a barrier to the ambition of these young women. The Black Campus Queens of 1991, in addition to pursuing careers in education, law and other traditional fields, are also preparing for careers in pathology, computer engineering, finance and TV production. Some even hope to be entrepreneurs and army generals.

May hail from Southern towns with names like Maplesville, Ala., Waycross, Ga., Gulfport, Miss., and Concord, N.C. But some were reared in Indianapolis, Washington, D.C., New Orleans, New York and Chicago. While growing up, they gained an appreciation for horseback riding, tennis, jazz and classical music. At the same time, they developed a commitment to educational excellence and community service.

Various Black campus queens are either on the Dean's List, listed in Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges, or both. They are members of honro societies, biomedical research teams, sororities, student government associations and leadership councils. Some tutor fellow students in math, while others work with battered women, organize Big Brothers-Big Sisters programs or help with student retention programs.

Despite their diversity, they share an overwhelming belief in themselves and the ability to make a difference in the world.

Kreslyon L. Valrie, Miss Alabama A&M University, is from Huuntsville. The senior telecommunications major is on the Dean's List.

Eva L. James of Gulfport, Miss., reigns at Alabama State University. She studies marketing and is a student orientation leader.

Cynthia A. Chargois is Miss Albany State College. An honor society member from Albany, Ga., she hopes to run a nursing home.

Cathy Hughes, an aspiring English professor from Magnolia, Miss., is Miss Alcorn State University. She enjoys music.

Joyce M. Cummings, who wants to report TV news, is Miss Allen University. An NAACP officer, she is from Summerville, S.C.

Sandra L. Gray of De Witt, Ark., is Miss Arkansas Baptist College. A basketball player, she is interested in computer sales.

Rosalind R. Smith, Miss University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff, is a local queen, who is on the National Dean's List.

Ingrid F. Nurse, who organized a Big Brothers/Big Sisters program, is Miss Barber-Scotia College. She is from Concord, N.C.

Kim Curnell is Miss Benedict College. A presidential scholar, she is from Charleston and is in a biomedical research program.

Yvette R. Williams, Miss Bennett College, is a senior from Indianapolis. The Marshall Board member hopes to be an educator.

Michele T. Herrington of Miami is Miss Bethune-Cookman College. A steel band member, she wants to be a TV news anchor.

Detrice T. Smith is queen of Central State University. Involved in Adopt-A-School, the Gary, Ind., coed plans to teach English.

Terri Thrift is Miss Cheyney University of Pennsylvania. From Franklin, Va., she plans to be a lawyer and is in a scholastic club.

Kimberly Woods, a senior at Claflin College, is from Greeleyville, S.C. She enjoys reading and hopes to be a probation officer.

Trecia Y. Wilhite, Miss Clark Atlanta University, is from Augusta, Ga. The honors club member plans to be a lawyer.

Chantelle M. Woodrum of Baltimore is Miss Coppin State College. The honors computer science major is a student senator.

Shawn Stokes is Miss Delaware State College.

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