Show Respect for This Flag

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), July 10, 2003 | Go to article overview

Show Respect for This Flag


Byline: BILLY KENNEDY

BILLY KENNEDY, News Letter journalist and

author of the Scots-Irish Chronicles (seven volumes),

explains the historical and cultural links

of the American Confederate Flag to Ulster

THE ALLIANCE Party appears to be exercising some muddled thinking over the origins and the legitimacy of the American Confederacy flag which is being flown in some loyalist areas of east Belfast in the run-up to the Twelfth.

For Alliance to summarily dismiss the Confederate flag as a racist emblem is to grievously insult the memory and the sacrifice of men and women of great courage, who fought a noble but unsuccessful fight against the numerically stronger and better equipped Union Army in the American Civil War of 1861-65.

The Confederate flag - the distinctive Stars and Bars - has, admittedly, been wrongly used by racist elements in the United States, in a way that sometimes the Union Flag, the Ulster Flag, or the Irish Tricolour, can be dragged in the gutter, by those who, while purporting to uphold what it stands for, show absolutely no respect for it.

While not wanting to enter into the argument over whether or not it should be flown here over the Twelfth, the Stars and Bars is not an illegal paramilitary flag.

It flies from many civic buildings in the United States - and is an emblem with more relevance to Ulster/Irish culture and history, than the Israeli or Palestinian flags that can be seen flying from lamp-posts on our Northern Ireland streets.

The Confederacy in the United States during the mid-19th century was a cause considered lawful and respectable by many millions of people in the Southern states in America, quite a number of whom had Ulster-Scots Presbyterian family origins.

Indeed, support for the Confederacy in the South also came from a significant percentage of Americans from an Irish Roman Catholic background, many of whom left Ireland after the Great Irish Famine, in 1845-49.

Together, rightly, or wrongly, many in the Ulster and Irish diaspora settled in the Southern states considered it a duty to resist the imposition of federal laws by the then Washington Administration.

The Confederate nation composed of 11 Southern states (Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia) that seceded from the United States in 1861.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Show Respect for This Flag
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.