What's So Gay about Gypsy? in Its Current Broadway Revival with Bernadette Peters, the Iconic Musical Remains a Must-See for Gay Audiences

By Shewey, Don | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), June 24, 2003 | Go to article overview

What's So Gay about Gypsy? in Its Current Broadway Revival with Bernadette Peters, the Iconic Musical Remains a Must-See for Gay Audiences


Shewey, Don, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


Gypsy * Book by Arthur Laurents, music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim * Directed by Sam Mendes * Starring Bernadette Peters, Tammy Blanchard; and John Dossett * Shubert Theatre, New York City (open run)

This summer, the top destination for gay theater-loving visitors to New York will undoubtedly be the Broadway revival of Gypsy, starring Bernadette Peters. One of the all-time great musicals, it has a score packed with glorious top-drawer tunes. Based on the autobiography of world-famous stripper Gypsy Rose Lee, the show centers on her relationship with her mother, Rose, who drove her to fame and then drove her away. The parental concern that slides into narcissism, the child's rebellion that is required for individuation--the themes of Gypsy are as universal as any Greek myth.

Yet for all its resonance with gay audiences, Gypsy is not what you'd call a gay musical. While some of the original creators were gay (Arthur Laurents, who conceived the show and wrote the book, Stephen Sondheim, who wrote the lyrics, and Jerome Robbins, who directed and choreographed), the composer, Jule Styne, was not, and the current director, Sam Mendes (who directed the film American Beauty), is not. There's no overt gay content, even though in his memoir Laurents indicates that both Gypsy and her mother had lesbian relationships. So what gives this show its gay appeal?

Partly it's the diva thing. Just as opera queens relish debating the relative merits of Callas and Tebaldi in every role they ever sang, show folk can't resist measuring subsequent Roses (Angela Lansbury, Tyne Daly, Rosalind Russell, Bette Midler) against the ferocious standard set by Ethel Merman in the original production of Gypsy. Bernadette Peters may be the most unlikely Rose to date, and before the opening many wondered whether the sweetheart of Broadway could transform into the scary tyrant that Rose must be. Thankfully, her performance provides no definitive answer. Some critics went wild for it, but this picky queen (and ardent Bernadettephile) felt that for all the pain and ruthless determination she mustered, there was ultimately something missing, that her "Rose's Turn" was more temper tantrum than nervous breakdown. Nonetheless, it's worth seeing. …

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