Let Us Hear the Parents

By Singh, Delar K. | Journal of Instructional Psychology, June 2003 | Go to article overview

Let Us Hear the Parents


Singh, Delar K., Journal of Instructional Psychology


This paper reports the findings of structured interviews that were conducted with 40 mothers of school-age children with disabilities. Findings indicate that majority of the mothers are satisfied with special education services that their children with disabilities receive in their respective schools. Findings also point to family preferences that the professionals could consider while collaborating with parents.

**********

Family is a context from which children emerge. It is a powerful resource. Acknowledging the family's contribution to child development and considering the impact of childhood disability on the family, special education legislation rightly empowers the family. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (PL 105-17), previously known as Education for All Handicapped Children Act (PL 94-142) and its amendments (PL 101-476, PL 99-457) mandate family's involvement in educational decision making (Smith, Polloway, Patton, & Dowdy, 1998). School professionals and parents have to work hand in hand and that is challenging, especially when parents of children with disabilities believe that their lives are tremendously difficult. (Turnbull and Turnbull, 1997; Fox, Vaughn, Wyattee, and Dunlap, 2002). There is anecdotal evidence that suggests that school and family collaborations are not always productive and not always conflict free. This study was designed to address the pressing need of current knowledge base. It aimed to collect data on maternal opinions and preferences as they relate to collaboration with school professionals on everyday basis. Specifically, the study addressed the following questions:

1. What is the opinion of mothers of children with disabilities about special education services that their children with disabilities receive in their schools?

2. How often would mothers of children with disabilities like to communicate with their disabled child's teacher?

3. What mode of communication do mothers of children with disabilities prefer when communicating with their disabled child's teacher?

4. How would teachers be more successful in collaborating with families of disabled children?

5. What would mothers of children with disabilities like to know about their child's school related work?

Research Method

Participants

Forty mothers of school- aged children with disabilities participated in the study. Mothers of children with disabilities were selected by the interviewers by method of availability and convenience. Participating mothers of children with disabilities represented friends, neighbors, relatives, and in some cases acquaintances. All participants were Caucasians. Children's disabilities included Down syndrome, learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, communication disorders, autism, juvenile diabetes and multiple disabilities. The mean age of children was 11.05 years with a standard deviation of 2.78. Mothers' ages ranged between 25 and 45 years.

Data Collection

Data were collected via interviews. Interviews were structured and they were audiotaped. The duration of each interview was approximately 30 minutes. Interviews were conducted in the homes of participating parents. Interviews were subsequently transcribed

The study was carried out as a class project in an Educational Research and Statistics, graduate level course. Elementary and secondary teachers from local schools conducted the interviews. These teachers were enrolled in the Graduate Teacher Education Program of a private university. All interviewers were Caucasians. Interviewers were fully trained in interview techniques. Also, they were given written directions to follow as they collected the interview data.

Results

All interviews were transcribed and coded. The author coded the interviews and calculated the frequency of maternal responses. This section discusses the findings, which correspond with the research questions posed earlier in this paper. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Let Us Hear the Parents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.