Act Now to Take the Stress out of Working Lives

The Journal (Newcastle, England), July 17, 2003 | Go to article overview

Act Now to Take the Stress out of Working Lives


Britain continues to be named Europe's hardest working country and the pressure is taking a dramatic toll on employees and the profitability of businesses.

In a survey of 100 businesses that use its 24-hour business support helpline, Croner Consulting reveals that 65pc of calls from senior management report employees complaining of stress in recent months, with 56pc admitting it was affecting their productivity.

The companies polled by Croner represent a cross-section of UK businesses, indicating that stress is widespread and not significantly linked to a particular industry or job.

Richard Smith, corporate and training manager at Croner said: "Our clients are telling us that stress is a serious issue for their employees and bottom line, but equally it is still often seen as part of modern day culture, a weakness in employees, or even an excuse for time off.

"In fact, employers have a legal obligation to ensure employees are not made ill by their work. But stress is still costing businesses, causing high staff turnover, a demotivated workforce, increased sickness and absence, poor performance and an increase in customer complaints.

"The longer businesses refuse to treat stress seriously, the worse poor performance and productivity will get. Couple this with a rise in stress related grievance claims and business is suffering in all key areas: time, money and people."

Stress is an adverse reaction to excessive pressure and if untreated can lead to depression, a nervous breakdown or heart disease. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Act Now to Take the Stress out of Working Lives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.