Internet Scammers Go 'Phishing'; Steal Personal Information by Imitating Legit Web Sites

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 22, 2003 | Go to article overview

Internet Scammers Go 'Phishing'; Steal Personal Information by Imitating Legit Web Sites


Byline: Tim Lemke, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The FBI yesterday warned Internet users about a sinister new connection between e-mail spam and Web sites designed to steal personal information.

The FBI joined the Federal Trade Commission to tell reporters the agencies have received increasing complaints of "phisher" Web sites, which try to dupe people into providing phone, credit-card and Social Security numbers over the Internet.

Typically, Internet users are directed to the sites by e-mails made to look like they come from legitimate companies.

The FTC said it settled civil charges with a teenager in California who used phisher sites to gather credit-card information from users of America Online. The teen agreed to pay $3,500 to settle the case, the FTC's first action against someone operating a phisher site.

"Consumers were told that their account would expire unless they updated certain personal information," FTC Commissioner Mozelle Thompson said. "The defendant then used the information to go on a shopping spree."

The FTC said the teen collected customer names and a host of personal financial information including credit card numbers, Social Security numbers, billing routing numbers and personal identification numbers. He used the information to make purchases online.

The penalty would have been more severe if the teen were an adult, Mr. Thompson said.

Earthlink, the nation's third-largest Internet service provider, and the National Consumers League cautioned consumers about the sites.

In an example displayed by Earthlink yesterday, a consumer received an e-mail disguised to look like it was sent by Earthlink's customer-service department. The e-mail said the company had lost information relating to the user's Internet account and directed the user to a Web site where he was asked to enter requested information.

America Online, EBay, Best Buy and other companies have reported that their Web sites have been imitated in similar fashion.

"This is something you will never see from a legitimate company," said David Baker, Earthlink's vice president for law and public policy.

Mr. Baker said it is "exceedingly unlikely" that a company would request information it already had collected. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Internet Scammers Go 'Phishing'; Steal Personal Information by Imitating Legit Web Sites
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.