NAACP's Lynching Theory Rejected; Judge Says Evidence in Hanging Points Only to Suicide

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 30, 2003 | Go to article overview

NAACP's Lynching Theory Rejected; Judge Says Evidence in Hanging Points Only to Suicide


Byline: Frank J. Murray, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A Florida police chief yesterday said he tried to stem lynching rumors by showing the local NAACP president evidence that a May hanging was a suicide, yet the group continued to stir racial unrest.

"We don't know where the mysterious rumors actually came from, but I first heard them shortly after the incident, the same day, directly from Linda Johnson, president of the local NAACP," Belle Glade Chief Michael R. Miller said in an interview shortly before an inquest that led some members of Feraris Golden's family and a circuit judge to reject the lynching theory.

Judge Harold Cohen ruled yesterday afternoon that suicide was the only explanation for the unemployed handyman's May 28 hanging, ending Palm Beach County's first public inquest in 18 years.

Dan Paige, a lawyer accompanying officials from the state chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said the judge instead should have ordered a murder investigation.

"We brought you what we thought the truth was and what it reflected," said Assistant State Attorney Doug Fulton, whose presentation vindicated Chief Miller's suicide theory.

The investigation began about 7 a.m. May 28, when Mr. Golden's body, rigid from rigor mortis, was found hanging from a 10-foot-high bough of a schefflera "umbrella tree" at his grandmother's house.

Chief Miller told The Washington Times that Miss Johnson called him that morning. He said he recognized the potential for community conflict in Miss Johnson's claims that Mr. Golden was bound and gagged. He invited Miss Johnson and a member of Mr. Golden's family to see a videotape from the dashboard camera of the first police car arriving at the hanging scene.

"The tape shown to Miss Johnson and to a member of the Golden family selected by them clearly showed his hands were swinging free. His feet weren't tied. He wasn't bound and gagged in any way," Chief Miller said.

But Miss Johnson and other state NAACP officials persisted in saying that Mr. Golden, 32, who was black, was lynched to avenge an affair with a white woman. Inquest witnesses could confirm no such affair.

"Rumors that he may have had a relationship with the daughter of a white police officer has caused the resurrection of a part of this country's history that is excluded from most history books," Miss Johnson wrote in June.

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NAACP's Lynching Theory Rejected; Judge Says Evidence in Hanging Points Only to Suicide
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