Wurst Case Scenario Is Good News for Sausage Lovers

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 30, 2003 | Go to article overview

Wurst Case Scenario Is Good News for Sausage Lovers


Don't let summer slip by without trying fresh bratwursts from Stiglmeier Sausage Co.

Started by Anton and Gertrude Stiglmeier, the company has been producing high-quality German-style sausages for more than 40 years. They moved the plant from Chicago to Wheeling 16 years ago.

Among the 70-some items you'll find an impressive selection of bratwursts. They offer smoked Thueringers, pork and veal brats as well as those made just for the grill and a spicy Hungarian version.

If that wasn't enough, it gets wurst: weisswurst, mettwurst, schinkenwurst and gelbwurst, to name a few.

Also look for German bologna, beer sausage, smoked and dried Black Forest ham and sweet potato soup.

My family sampled a few items and came away most surprised by kilometers - long, thin and spicy Hungarian links that you can eat with cheese and crackers. We warmed a few on the grill and found the flavor superb.

Some of their more popular products are available at a handful of specialty and European delis including Edlelweiss Delicatessen in Palatine, Kuhn's Delicatessen in Des Plaines, Alpine Delicatessen in Niles and Delicatessen Meyer and Miara's Deli both in Chicago.

Browse the catalog (which includes storage and serving information) online at www.stiglmeier.com or ask for one by calling (800) 451-8199. You can place your order via computer, phone or fax. Order soon so you can sample a few before deciding what to serve at your Labor Day cookout.

Inspired salad: You'd think that I would have gotten enough chicken salad after testing the varieties for last week's story, but you'd be wrong.

After receiving a bottle of Carrot Ginger Dressing from Trader Joe's I couldn't wait to try it in a simple, and I stress the word simple, salad that plays on the Asian theme.

Crush a package of ramen noodles (save the spice packet for something else) and toss the noodles with the dressing in a large bowl. Add 1 1/2 to 2 cups shredded, roasted chicken and 8 ounces of broccoli slaw and a thinly sliced cucumber. Stir to combine, breaking up clumps of noodles where needed. Serve garnished with chopped peanuts or cashews, if desired. Or spoon it onto a tortilla and eat wrap-style. Yum!

You can find the dressing - it also tastes delicious on a classic lettuce salad - under the Trader Ming moniker at area Trader Joe's for $1.89 a bottle.

Hi-octane barbecue: You can't get through the summer without barbecue sauce. And if you can't track down locally produced sauces from Uncle Dougies or the BarBeQue Man (his Door County Cherry sauce provides a nice balance of sweet and smoky), you might want to whisk up your own. …

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