GM Foods to Be Sold in Europe; Foot Noteslondonjobs

By Gibbs, Kate | The Evening Standard (London, England), July 7, 2003 | Go to article overview

GM Foods to Be Sold in Europe; Foot Noteslondonjobs


Gibbs, Kate, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: KATE GIBBS

The European Parliament has passed a law allowing GM foods to be sold in Europe. The changes require that food, food derivatives and animal feed containing more than 0.9 per cent genetically modified content are labelled.

Europeans will now be checking their food goods for the translation of "this product is produced from GMOs", possibly as soon as the autumn. This disappoints the Soil Association, which argues that it will be impossible for the public to be sure that they are buying products uncontaminated by GMOs, because food with less than 0.9 per cent GM does not have to be labelled. The Association adds that the best way to give UK consumers confidence that their food is GM-free is to ensure that no GM crops are grown in the UK.

'Poor driving' nets dolphins

Dolphins and porpoises are entangling themselves in fishing nets as they are unable to detect them in their navigation across the seas. Marine biologists in the US have argued that the tens of thousands that die each year in fishing nets are partly responsible for their own demise, blaming the cetaceans' "poor driving". But a leading UK authority on the issue says that fishing nets are alien to marine life, and dolphins could not be expected to understand such dangers.

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