Book Reviews

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), August 8, 2003 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews


Pip by Freya North.

Fans of Freya North's two previous best-sellers, Fen and Cat, will have come across the heroine of her new book, Pip McCabe before.

This latest offering, named as usual after the central character - completes the trilogy about the McCabe sisters.

Highly independent, Pip's life revolves around her job as a clown and looking after her sisters and she's convinced she doesn't need a man or much money to feel fulfilled.

But even Pip admits she needs some support, especially after her emotionally draining days working as a clown doctor in a hospital, cheering up desperately ill children.

And it's that unlikely setting which sees her meet handsome doctor Caleb, and accountant Zac - plus his six-year-old son.

While it's lust at first sight with the former, she's convinced there's nothing an accountant and a clown can have in common.

After fate keeps throwing her and Zac together, Pip begins to realise she can't shut herself off from love forever - as well as discovering that sisterly support works both ways.

With a cast including Zac's beautiful but artificial girlfriend, his ex-wife and sister-in-law - both good friends, and both determined to give him a happy ending - not to mention Pip's sisters and eccentric uncle, the story's ending is never in doubt, but getting there is a hugely entertaining journey.

Funny and witty as ever, the clown doctor storyline also makes the novel surprisingly moving - based on genuine clowns who work in hospitals, the description of the sick kids and laughter the clowns bring to them brings a lump to the throat.

For those who have read the previous novels - and it's just as good if you haven't - the story fills in the gaps North has been hinting at, as well as adding an extra layer of detail to the previous tales. …

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