Dealing with the Russians: Imagine You're Sitting in the Oval Office. What Advice Would You Offer George W. Bush? (A Symposium of Views)

The International Economy, Summer 2003 | Go to article overview

Dealing with the Russians: Imagine You're Sitting in the Oval Office. What Advice Would You Offer George W. Bush? (A Symposium of Views)


Background:

Earlier in his administration, President Bush pronounced that he had looked into the eyes of Russian President Vladimir Putin and taken a measure of his soul. Since then, the international community has assumed that this increasingly intimate "George/Vladimir" relationship would help provide a sense of long-term stability to the global scene. Has the official Russian response to the Iraq War compromised this sense of stability, or was the Russian leader never really much in control of his government--particularly his foreign ministry--to begin with? To what extent will the development of oil resources continue to play a role in the U.S.-Russian relationship? If President Bush asked you for a quick word of advice on how best to deal with the Russians from here on, how would you respond?

ANDERS ASLUND

Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

For the past four years, Russia has achieved an average annual economic growth of 6 percent, and this expansion continues apace. The growth comes from a broad range of Russian-owned enterprises and it has been driven by radical tax reform and fiscal adjustments, while foreign investment or aid have been inconsequential. Since 1993 the United States has promised to abolish the discriminatory Jackson-Vanik Amendment of 1974, but it has still not managed to do so.

On September 11, 2001, President Putin immediately supported President Bush in his war against terrorism, but the United States gave Russia nothing in return, while withdrawing from the bilateral Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and enlarging NATO. By being so friendly to the United States, President Putin started looking weak and foolish. The Russian mood turned anti-American before the war in Iraq, which benefited the communists, and this is an election year in Russia. Mr. Putin had to go along with the public mood, which has strengthened the old anti-American Soviet security establishment, and WTO accession has been delayed. Today, Russia does not ask for anything from the United States, and the United States has nothing to often

Ironically, the United States has become dependent on Russia in three important regards. First, the embargo against Iraq could not be lifted without Russia's consent in the UN Security Council. Otherwise, ships trading with Iraq could be legally seized on the high sea. Second, Russia's assent is also needed for any debt relief for Iraq in the Paris Club. If not, international financing to Iraq would be encumbered. Third, Russia has a strong interest in selling peaceful nuclear technology to Iran, which the United States firmly opposes because of Iran's endeavors to develop nuclear arms. President Bush needs to make a credible commitment that the United States can deliver something that is worthwhile for Russia, but what could that be and how can he establish any credibility?

PETER AVEN

President, Alfa Bank, Russia

First and foremost, President Bush needs to take steps to add depth to U.S.-Russian relations. Over the past two years President Bush has built a very solid relationship with President Putin, but it is not clear that this warmth and trust extend much beyond this personal relationship. The farther one gets from the Bush-Putin relationship, the more ties tend to be conducted on the basis of old, dated models of U.S.-Russian relations. President Bush needs to insist that his Cabinet and sub-Cabinet officials take a more active interest in Russia, arranging regular visits and developing agendas for cooperation which can build a more comprehensive basis for future ties. We Russians firmly believe that we understand the United States better than the Americans understand us, and it would serve the relationship well if more senior-level U.S. figures--both government and private-sector--spent more time in Russia meeting with our experts and learning that old models no longer fit the "new Russia. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dealing with the Russians: Imagine You're Sitting in the Oval Office. What Advice Would You Offer George W. Bush? (A Symposium of Views)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.