Fixing Social Security at Age 68

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 10, 2003 | Go to article overview

Fixing Social Security at Age 68


Byline: James L. Martin, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Most senior citizens know Aug. 14 as the eve of V-J Day: the day in 1945, 58 years ago, that the Japanese stopped fighting, ending World War II.

But Aug. 14 also marks another historic occasion: the day in 1935, 10 years prior to V-J Day, that Social Security began.

Unfortunately, both the bloody Pacific campaigns of World War II and the much-scarred Social Security retirement program, created during the Depression, soon might be remembered only in our history books. While there is little we can do to prevent the demise of the World War II generation, most of whom are now at least in their 80s, there is much we can do to prevent the demise of Social Security. We can fix the program.

That is why I'm calling on all of my fellow seniors this Aug. 14 to dedicate their energies to the necessary task of updating the tattered federal retirement program. We need not do it for ourselves; we will be fine. No politician would be stupid enough to even try to deny us our due. They have seen the seniors lobby in action and they know better.

But we do need to fix the program. We need to do it for our grandchildren.

Even in its weakened (and still weakening) financial condition, Social Security will clearly outlast the World War II and Korean War generations. When our children - the 77 million baby boomers - start retiring, however, the system will plunge into the red, paying out more in benefits than it receives in taxes. By the time our grandchildren and their children reach retirement age, Social Security will only be a shadow of its former self, or a distant memory - unless we do something to fix it, and do it soon.

What that something should be continues to be the subject of heated debate.

Some people want to keep the program pretty much as it is. And that's certainly an option. With lower birth rates and longer life expectancies, however, the current system could only survive by increasing taxes, reducing benefits, raising the retirement age another few years (some have suggested 70) - or some combination of the three.

This would be a bad deal for our grandchildren. Social Security taxes already are high enough. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Fixing Social Security at Age 68
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.