Forthright & Fearless

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), August 11, 2003 | Go to article overview

Forthright & Fearless


Byline: IVOR WYNNE JONES

SO three-quarters of the people of North Wales would like to see the back of Chief Constable Richard Brunstrom -assuming the response to the Daily Post survey was representative of the love/hate relationship with the man who took over the force three years ago.

The reader response was certainly bigger than samples used in many national opinion polls to assess such things as political trends,balloting intentions or tastes in food.

Some people thrive on criticism. Newspaper columnists love it,for it tells them people have been distracted from their TV screens long enough to debate and formulate their own opinions. Politicians,from Town Hall to Westminster, seem oblivious to criticism,having entered the democratic jungle in the belief they really do know what is best for us.

On the other hand there are those in whom criticism festers while they wait for an opportunity to exact their revenge.

We do not know where Mr Brunstrom sits in the face of criticism,especially when it comes from an expert like a recently retired assistant chief constable of North Wales.

Perhaps Mr Brunstrom enjoys the daily evidence of his controversial policies' causing people to think. On the other hand, we have seen his strange response to the relatively insignificant criticism from a motorist unhappy with the circumstances surrounding his speeding fine. Mr Brunstrom convened a special press conference at which he attacked his critic with video footage and a portfolio of 31 photographs. …

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