All Together Now

By Grant, Graham | Daily Mail (London), August 19, 2003 | Go to article overview

All Together Now


Grant, Graham, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: GRAHAM GRANT

FOR generations, schoolchildren have been encouraged to compete against each other to be 'top of the class'.

Now a new classroom project is turning this idea on its head - so that the only way pupils can excel is by helping each other.

Co- operative learning is an attempt to foster better teamworking skills and communication between pupils.

Children with varying talents are grouped together and set specific tasks which they can only achieve by collaborating with classmates.

The approach - which does away with the old dictum of 'no talking in class' and encourages pupils to share their opinions - makes it less likely that any individual will always be 'the best'.

But the idea, now being implemented in North Lanarkshire schools, is likely to prove controversial with traditionalists.

Previous research has shown that bright pupils can be held back in mixed-ability classes, a finding which has prompted calls for the reintroduction of 'streaming' - where pupils of similar academic prowess are taught together.

Despite the concerns, education bosses at North Lanarkshire say the pilot scheme has proved extremely successful and they now plan to extend it across the region.

Supporters of the concept say cooperative learning prepares pupils for the workplace, where working as part of a team is a vital skill.

Pupils with artistic skills can be grouped with classmates who have good computing skills, while children who are talented communicators can sit alongside pupils who are accomplished writers. Co-operative learning - likened by some to the Big Brother reality television programme, where contestants win rewards by completing tasks using teamwork skills - is also said to make children more self-confident.

The technique was pioneered in Ontario, Canada, in 1985, where schools which used the method reported a dramatic rise in attainment levels.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

All Together Now
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.