Learning to Lead: In the Second Part of a Report from the Recent American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) International Conference, NZIM CEO David Chapman Explores Leading Thinkers' Thoughts on Leadership

By Chapman, David | New Zealand Management, August 2003 | Go to article overview

Learning to Lead: In the Second Part of a Report from the Recent American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) International Conference, NZIM CEO David Chapman Explores Leading Thinkers' Thoughts on Leadership


Chapman, David, New Zealand Management


Seems that everywhere you turn these days people are talking and writing about leadership--whether political, business, sporting or spiritual.

What all this verbiage reveals is that there are many different definitions and ideas of what constitutes good leadership--from heroic and inspirational to supportive and empathetic.

Personally, I favour the servant/leader model and believe good leadership is less about individual heros as about the ability of an organisation to nurture leadership at all levels. While we can all learn from good role models, I believe we put far too much emphasis on their contributions. This can de-motivate people who have good leadership potential simply because they don't see themselves as cut in the heroic mould.

A more encompassing definition of a leader is "every person who has the task to direct others".

I was impressed by William Rosenbach's answer to the question: can leadership be taught? (Management April 2003.) He responded "wrong question--leadership can be learned".

For NZIM, leadership has always been an important piece of our management learning mosaic and in recent times we have pushed hard to specifically include leadership learning at all levels.

A recent NZIM-supported initiative is Leadership New Zealand, set up with a vision to create a culture of leadership across the community, assisting and promoting leadership and emerging leaders.

Academia has also weighed in with the University of Auckland's recently established Institute of Leadership. With all this local focus on leadership, it was timely to hear current offshore thinking on the subject from speakers at the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) Conference in San Diego (May 2003).

Ken Blanchard charts the journey

Ken Blanchard (of One Minute Manager fame) spoke about "the journey to effective leadership" focusing on three key areas.

* vision (or direction)

* equipping people

* epositive consequences and sustainability.

Vision defines an image of the future that must be clear and communicated to all, so every employee has a sense of ownership and involvement. Important elements include: the mission--defined in relation to your customers and what they are going to get out of it: the goals define what you want your people to focus on now; the values, or what you stand for, guides your journey.

Equipping people is about preparing them for the journey to the vision. A self-serving leader shuts down feedback but a servant leader shows appreciation. Once you know yourself, the task is to better each of your managers "one on one".

Positive consequences and sustainability involves catching people "doing something right" to reinforce and sustain the journey to the vision.

First: build trust--employees must know you are there to help them win. People who produce results are happy. If they don't produce, maybe it's not the right job for them.

Second: accentuate the positive (one minute praising), don't wait for exactly the right behaviour. If something is done wrong, redirect to another task, don't waste energy on the errors. Describe the error without blame, show its negative impact, go over the task in detail then express your trust and confidence in the person.

"The biggest opportunity for leadership," says Blanchard, "is when things are going right."

Frances Hasselbein--the time is now

As chair of the Peter Drucker Foundation for Non-profit Management and editor in chief of the journal Leader to Leader, Frances Hasselbein's management ideas have influenced business leaders worldwide.

Her inspiring address contained much to illuminate the leadership debate.

* Disperse the tasks of leadership across the organisation until there are leaders at every level and dispersed leadership is the reality.

* Make every leader accountable for building the richly diverse team, group or organisation.

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Learning to Lead: In the Second Part of a Report from the Recent American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) International Conference, NZIM CEO David Chapman Explores Leading Thinkers' Thoughts on Leadership
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