The Effect of Chromaticity Varies with Object Identification Response: Speeded Naming versus Recognition

By Ryan, Carolyn S.; Hemmes, Nancy S. et al. | The Psychological Record, Summer 2003 | Go to article overview

The Effect of Chromaticity Varies with Object Identification Response: Speeded Naming versus Recognition


Ryan, Carolyn S., Hemmes, Nancy S., Brown, Bruce L., The Psychological Record


One objective of the present study was to systematically replicate Biederman and Cooper's research. A second objective was to extend that investigation to the stimulus attribute of color by evaluating effects of chromaticity and shape on speeded naming and recognition responses. Similar to the effect of size on object identification, the effect of color appears to be influenced by the type of object identification response required. Under different discrimination procedures, chromaticity has been found to have a positive effect, no effect, or a negative effect on identification. For naming, chromaticity had a positive effect in a number of experiments (Biederman & Ju, 1988, Experiment 3; Davidoff & Ostergaard, 1988, Experiment 2; Ostergaard & Davidoff, 1985, Experiments 1A, 2A, & 3; Price & Humphreys, 1989); however, adverse or no effects of color on naming responses have also been found in three other experiments (Biederman & Ju, 1988, Experiments 1 & 2; Ostergaard & Davidoff, 1985, Experiment 2B). In studies using verification or classification responses, chromaticity had no effect on identification (Biederman & Ju, 1988, Experiments 4 & 5; Davidoff & Ostergaard, 1988; Experiment 1); however, Price and Humphreys (1989) did find an advantage of congruent chromaticity on classification. Mixed effects have also been obtained for old/new recognition responding (Boynton & Dolensky, 1979; Cave et al., 1996; Ostergaard & Davidoff, 1985; Seamon et al., 1997; Suzuki & Takahashi, 1997). Further, magnitude of the Stroop effect appears to vary with the method used by the participant to name the color of the Stroop stimuli (for a review, see Durgin, 2000).

The present report extends this literature by studying the effects of chromaticity on two object identification responses--oral speeded naming and oral recognition (same/different) responding--under identical stimulus conditions. The effects of chromaticity on naming (rather than speeded naming) and recognition were compared in a previous study. Ostergaard and Davidoff (1985) found that colored photographs presented tachistoscopically were named more quickly than achromatic photos, but that chromaticity had no effect in a recognition task employing the same stimuli. Similarly, Seamon et al. (1997), using chromatic images only, found that hue did not affect recognition responding in a study comparing recognition and affective responding. In contrast, Joseph and Proffitt (1996) found that congruently colored objects were recognized more easily than incongruently colored objects. Cave et al. (1996) compared speeded naming and recognition when hue varied between the first and second presentation of each stimulus (study and test exposures). Stimuli were monochromatic line drawings appearing in one of four colors in Experiment 1, or one of two colors in Experiment 2. Stimulus duration was variable; stimuli remained visible until the participant responded. Speeded naming latency or accuracy did not vary as a function of change in stimulus hue from study to test; however, in contrast to the findings of Ostergaard and Davidoff and Seamon et al., change in hue did produce a small decrement on recognition performance.

In the present study stimuli were 2-dimensional drawings with textural depth cues. Chromatic stimuli were realistically colored with multiple hues. Stimulus duration was fixed (100 ms), and a mask immediately followed each stimulus. Three experiments were conducted in a systematic replication of Biederman and Cooper's (1992) study that showed an effect of image size on affected recognition, but not on speeded naming responses. In each experiment, a priming procedure was used under which a sequence of 28, 2-dimensional representations of common objects was presented two times in succession. Shape and/or size (Experiment 1) or shape and/or chromaticity (Experiments 2 and 3) of the objects could change between their first and second exposures. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Effect of Chromaticity Varies with Object Identification Response: Speeded Naming versus Recognition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.