Justice and Judicial Proceedings

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 31, 2003 | Go to article overview

Justice and Judicial Proceedings


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

I would like to start by saying that I find it hard to believe any reputable paper would allow the printing of such an inaccurate, unsubstantiated article as the one by Chris Kerr titled "Justice Kennedy on the Law" (Op-Ed, Wednesday).

Twenty-four years as a federal agent certainly does not qualify him as an expert in any area of prisons, treatment of inmates, judicial discretion or apparently the ability to research facts and statistics.

"The point is that the justice's recent speech shows him to be far out of step with most of America. ..." When did Mr. Kerr poll the citizens of the United States for their views and opinions regarding Justice Kennedy's remarks? I missed that poll, and so did the members of many organizations that are fighting for the rights of Americans along with the American Bar Association, the American Civil Liberties Union and many family members of these so-called vicious inmates. I would appreciate it if in the future Mr. Kerr would not try to represent his terribly misguided thoughts as my opinion.

"For years, before enactment of these reforms, law enforcement officers would literally risk their lives and spend the public's treasure to eliminate some threat to society, only to watch the predator appear at his day of reckoning in his Sunday best with a new haircut and a sobbing girlfriend or mother." The public is fully aware that law enforcement deals mainly in information obtained from "snitches." I did not see mention of the thousands of corrupt police officers and agents appearing in court with the same Sunday suit (generally bought with our tax dollars) and a family that also cares about the outcome. Again, Mr. Kerr, please get some statistics to back up your assertions.

"Out the door they sauntered off to continue preying upon defenseless victims." Again, a very misguided statement. …

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