Talks about Military Censorship of Press: Senator Albert Gore Jr. Expresses Mixed Feelings about It in AAEC Speech. He Also Discusses Editorial Cartooning and More

By Astor, Davis | Editor & Publisher, May 4, 1991 | Go to article overview

Talks about Military Censorship of Press: Senator Albert Gore Jr. Expresses Mixed Feelings about It in AAEC Speech. He Also Discusses Editorial Cartooning and More


Astor, Davis, Editor & Publisher


Talks about military censorship of press

A possible 1992 presidential candidate gave a partial thumbs-down to military censorship of the press.

"As a former journalist, I do not go along with that," said Senator Albert Gore Jr. (D.-Tenn.), who worked as a Nashville Tennessean reporter for several years before entering politics. "There are some legitimate reasons for the military to limit was coverage, but I think the concerns of journalists need to be adequately dealt with. The balance has tipped too far."

Gore, who was responding to a question at the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists convention in Memphis April 27, did defend the right of the U.S. military to mislead the media about its Persian Gulf war attack plans. This helped save American lives, said the AAEC keynote speaker.

But Milwaukee Journal editorial cartoonist Bill Sanders, speaking from the audience, took issue with the press being lied to and not trusted. "Do you actually think journalists would have reported [the real attack plans]?" he asked angrily.

"I wouldn't think they would have reported the rape victim's name," retorted Gore, referring to the incident at the Kennedy family's Florida estate.

Gore, a Vietnam veteran who voted this January to authorize the use of force to drive Iraq out of Kuwait, opened the question session following his speech by commenting: "I am so keenly aware of how dangerous this crowd is."

But he said he enjoys looking at political cartoons and noted specifically that some of the editorial drawings about the Los Angeles police brutality case were "deeply moving."

The senator also said he is aware of how hard an editorial cartoonist's job can be. Gore recalled working in a cubicle near AAEC member Sandy Campbell while at the Tennessean, and observed, "I know how much torture some of you go through thinking up ideas."

Gore, who ran for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1988, also had various non-cartooning and non-media comments about the Gulf and other topics.

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