Device Curbs Kids' TV Viewing: Ally in Obesity Prevention

By Jancin, Bruce | Clinical Psychiatry News, August 2003 | Go to article overview

Device Curbs Kids' TV Viewing: Ally in Obesity Prevention


Jancin, Bruce, Clinical Psychiatry News


DENVER -- A modest-looking little box that sits atop the family television set can be a powerful ally in preventing pediatric obesity.

"I think this is a fabulous device," Dr. Susan Z. Yanovski said at an international conference of the Academy for Eating Disorders.

She was referring to TV Allowance, a device that allows families to limit children's weekly television viewing.

In light of the well-documented linear relationship between hours of TV watched per week and the risk of obesity, both in kids and adults, TV Allowance can play a significant role in parental efforts to encourage children to reduce sedentary behavior to prevent obesity, said Dr. Yanovski, a family physician who is director of the obesity and, eating disorders program at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases in Bethesda, Md.

Here's how TV Allowance works: Parents allot their children a certain amount of TV viewing. "In our house it happens to be 4 hours a week per kid," Dr. Yanovski said. Then each child chooses a four-digit PIN. When they want to watch a show they enter their secret code.

"They decide when and what they're going to watch. And when their weekly time is up, the TV shuts off. It takes away the locus of control battles between parent and child," she said at the conference, sponsored by the University of New Mexico.

Television watching was first identified as a risk factor for obesity in the 1990 National Longitudinal Survey on Youth. Among kids who watched no more than 1 hour per day, the prevalence of overweight was 18%. With 5 or more hours per day, the prevalence of overweight nearly doubled. This linear relationship has since been demonstrated in many other studies in children.

In a separate presentation, Dr. C. Barr Taylor, professor of psychiatry and medicine at Stanford (Calif. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Device Curbs Kids' TV Viewing: Ally in Obesity Prevention
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.