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Iraq's Guerrilla War

Newsweek International, September 8, 2003 | Go to article overview

Iraq's Guerrilla War


Readers of our July 21 cover story on the Iraqi resistance all condemned the U.S. presence. Wrote one, "I hope this doesn't turn into another Vietnam." Another said, "The only link between 9/11, Iraq and terrorism is the U.S. government." A third echoed, "Americans have been duped."

Fighting the Saddam Factor

I enjoyed your July 21 article "Still Fighting Saddam" (Special Report). It gave a picture of the realities of the war that other U.S. media have been shy to portray, perhaps because it might seem unpatriotic. I was particularly shocked by your sidebar ("The Cost of Empire") on the amount of foreign aid that has been used by the United States to support the war on terror in this year alone. How is it that all of the billions of dollars used to fight terror, in Iraq and Afghanistan combined, do not even equal the billions that are being spent to support Israel? I think it is about time that NEWSWEEK and the American public take a closer look at U.S.-Israel relations. We need to know what has long been going on between these two countries but is still kept under wraps. That is a lot of money for a small country.

Gretchen McDowell

Tegucigalpa, Honduras

I hope Iraq does not turn into another fiasco like Vietnam. As it is, day by day, it is becoming more embarrassing and painful for U.S. and British soldiers on Iraqi soil. This time, the soldiers are facing an invisible enemy. They are far from home and the end of the war is not even in sight. It is easy enough to fabricate a case to wage war on a sovereign country without the approval of the United Nations; it is difficult to justify it and bring it to a successful end. The precedent of Iraq speaks for itself because the phantom of Saddam still haunts U.S. and British armed forces, grounded in Iraq for a long, hot summer and many more surprises. History will write its own version of Americans' presence in Iraq.

Syed Rashid Ali Shah

Vroomshoop, Netherlands

The American public is finally beginning to catch on. It is dawning on Americans that they have been well and truly duped--on Iraq, on tax cuts for the rich, on quite a few other matters. But why did it take so long? Outside the United States, most people's opinions of George W. Bush and the Republicans are almost exactly the same now as they were before the invasion of Iraq began.

Mark MacCallum

Wellington, New Zealand

The only connection linking 9/11, Iraq and future terror events are the people controlling the U.S. government. And if fear should fail to turn public opinion, there is always vote tampering for them to fall back on.

Thomas L. Potter

Olmsted Falls, Ohio

If Saddam is organizing a guerrilla resistance to the U.S. occupation of his country, he is well within his rights. Bush and Blair fooled everybody and intimidated the world into believing that Saddam Hussein was a threat to world peace and that Iraqis wanted to get rid of the tyrant. Only a handful of countries (such as France, Iran and Syria) tried to raise their voice against the Coalition's plans. All others-- the so-called champions of Islam--remained mute like spineless spectators. Now, as events unfold and facts emerge (courtesy of some U.S. congressmen and the BBC), we learn that the evidence justifying the invasion was all cooked up in the States and Britain at the behest of their two governments. The world community ought to seize the opportunity and stand up to these two thugs and call their bluff.

Rajinder K. Sudan

Jammu, India

What is going on when the leader of our country does not even realize that our armed forces are at war? And are we still at war in Afghanistan, or did he declare the war against terrorism over? The only reports on casualties or combat come out of Iraq, none from Afghanistan. Did we win or lose that war? Or will the next attack on our homeland from Al Qaeda determine that?

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