Dolores Martin, 68, Writer, Editor

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 15, 2003 | Go to article overview

Dolores Martin, 68, Writer, Editor


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Dolores Moyano Martin died at age 68 on Sept. 3 at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Northwest. The Bethesda resident had been battling cancer since last fall.

Mrs. Martin was a major contributor to knowledge and interpretation of Latin American culture, through her own writing as well as through her editorship of a major reference source for Latin American studies.

She wrote historical articles, literary criticism, political essays, memoirs and book reviews as well as short stories and translations of Latin American poetry. She was the editor of the Handbook of Latin American Studies, a publication of the Library of Congress, for more than 20 years.

Georgette Dorn, chief of the Hispanic Division of the library, said: "Dolores Martin's contributions to Latin American studies are immeasurable."

Mrs. Martin was born in Cordoba, Argentina, in 1934, a time when the city was a center of scholarship and intellectual ferment.

From her American mother and Argentinian father (who had met in Paris), she inherited family histories and traditions closely linked to the origins of the two republics. The background gave her an original perspective on the cultures of both continents.

Mrs. Martin came to the United States to study at Vassar College, from which she graduated in 1956. She later did graduate work at American University in Washington.

After coming to the D.C. area, she held various positions at the Embassy of Argentina, the Inter-American Development Bank and the Center for Research in Social Systems. From 1977 to 1980 she was also a consultant to U.S. Rep. John Brademas, Indiana Democrat.

She began her career at the Library of Congress in 1970 and retired in 1999. She served as an officer or was on the advisory board of all the main professional associations for Latin American history and studies.

Her honors included a Distinguished Service Award from the Latin American Chapter of the American Historical Association and the Jose Toribio Medina Award for Outstanding Contribution to Latin American Scholarship.

Mrs.

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