William J. Gill, 81, Journalist, Lecturer

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 16, 2003 | Go to article overview
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William J. Gill, 81, Journalist, Lecturer


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

William J. Gill, a prize-winning journalist, lecturer, consultant on trade to U.S. industry and president of the American Coalition for Competitive Trade, died Sept. 3 of pulmonary disorder at his home in the District. He was 81.

Mr. Gill was born in New York City. He attended Blessed Sacrament Grammar School and De La Salle Academy. He graduated from the University of Missouri with a degree in journalism. He settled in Pittsburgh and worked for many years in public relations for the steel industry, making frequent trips to the District.

Mr. Gill's lung disease stemmed from malaria, which he suffered while serving in the Army Air Forces in the Pacific during World War II.

Mr. Gill was a correspondent for United Press International and the Pittsburgh Press as well as a contributor to Life, Fortune, the Saturday Evening Post, Reader's Digest, National Geographic and a range of other publications. In 1963, he wrote and produced a series of television programs that won the Golden Quill award for public service from Sigma Delta Chi, a journalism organization.

In 1967, Mr. Gill co-authored "Suite 3505: The Story of the Draft Goldwater Movement" with conservative strategist F. Clifton White. The book is an insider's view of the reshaping of conservative politics during the 1960s.

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