When the Boy Models Took Their T-Shirts off, the Women Rushed to Get a Better View

By Booth, Lauren | New Statesman (1996), August 25, 2003 | Go to article overview

When the Boy Models Took Their T-Shirts off, the Women Rushed to Get a Better View


Booth, Lauren, New Statesman (1996)


Some invites can't be refused. And given that ogling men is perfectly acceptable so long as you can say postmodernist feminist without drooling, I went to give the Men's Health cover models the once-over at the Trafalgar Hilton.

The boys on parade, all keen to become this year's symbol of perfect manhood, wore identical jeans and clingy white T-shirts. I heard myself saying: "I feel awful thinking about these young guys as bits of meat--but, oh dear God, look at that one!" It quickly became clear that most of the women, while appreciating the hours of training the models put in, just aren't that attracted to mini-Arnie types. A TV producer downed her champagne. She cast a harsh, agent's eye over the tanned and plucked young men, and then announced: "Gay dwarves, sweetie, do absolutely nothing for me."

I've often laughingly said that all it takes for men to become our slaves are breasts and booze. But biceps and Bolly turn media women into animals. Still, the producer had a point. All of the male models were smaller than expected--around five foot seven or eight. Hearing our comments, an editor on Men's Health felt she had to tell us that "health has no height restriction". Fine, fit men can be less than six foot, but do they all demand that their gym partners pluck their eyebrows before they can train together? Do men into outdoor sports all apply fake tan and shave their chests? Does waxing yourself from head to toe make you a better rugby player? One of the boys had eyebrows so over-plucked he wore a look of pained indignation identical to Lily Savage's.

The champagne was slipping down very easily by the time it came to the judging. "I'm not interested in the result," I sighed, lighting a cigarette. Then the compare said: "The contestants will now take off their shirts, please." Suddenly, a glass smashed and expensive shoes trampled on my toes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

When the Boy Models Took Their T-Shirts off, the Women Rushed to Get a Better View
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.