Memory Self-Efficacy and Memory Performance in Older Males

By McDougall, Graham J.; Kang, Jeonghee | International Journal of Men's Health, May 2003 | Go to article overview

Memory Self-Efficacy and Memory Performance in Older Males


McDougall, Graham J., Kang, Jeonghee, International Journal of Men's Health


The study reported here was a secondary analysis of data on 157 males from a larger study of predictors of memory performance in community-dwelling elders. The males' average age was 76 years, with 13 years of education and a Mini-Mental State Exam score of 26. Measures included depression, memory performance, metamemory, and memory self-efficacy. An unusual finding was the multimodal distribution of memory self-efficacy strength scores. Using a median split, the sample was divided into low and high memory self-efficacy groups. The high efficacy group were significantly younger, had larger scores on capacity (+ = high capacity) and change (+ = greater stability). These findings provide new evidence that the memory self-efficacy of aging males influences their perceptions of cognitive performance related to memory.

Key Words: memory performance, gender difference, aging males, self-efficacy

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Data from the Health and Retirement study published in Older Americans 2000: Key Indicators of Well Being suggest that in every age cohort older than 65 years, a higher percentage of males than females have moderate or severe memory impairment, defined as four of fewer words recalled out of 20 (Federal Interagency Forum of Aging-Related Statistics, 2000). In both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of memory performance, males performed worse than females and had larger performance decrements (Barrett-Connor & Kritz-Silverstein, 1999; Zelinski, Gilewski, & Schaie, 1993). In one study healthy older males had lower scores on self-reported memory function than females (McDougall, 1998a). In another study of nursing home residents, McDougall (1998b) found scores on the capacity and change metamemory scales were significantly lower in the group with mixed depression and cognitive impairment when compared to a group with cognitive impairment and no depression. This phenomenon of compromised thinking, anxiety, and decreased confidence in memory has been described as mental frailty by McDougall and Balyer (1998) and sense of control by Lachman, Steinberg, and Trotter (1987) and Lachman and Leff (1989). Palmer, Wolkenstein, LaRue, Swan, and Smalley (1994) found that in 6% of a sample of community males (N = 1149), memory performance scores were low enough to be classified as risk for dementia. Larrabee and Crook (1993), who examined 417 male-female pairs, found that males had greater age-associated atrophy of the left hemisphere than women; however, this difference was not manifested in everyday verbal memory. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have also found greater atrophy and shrinkage in the brain structures of men than in the brains of women (Coffey et al., 1998; Larkin, 1998; Palmer et al., 1994).

RISK FACTORS THOUGHT TO CONTRIBUTE TO A DECREASE IN MEMORY PERFORMANCE

MEMORY COMPLAINTS

Memory complaints are the subjective aspect of cognitive function and may be related to memory performance in older adults, but findings about this relationship are inconclusive (Comijs, Deeg, Dik, Twisk, & Jonker, 2002; Commissaris, Ponds, & Jolles, 1998; Hertzog, Dixon, & Hultsch, 1990a; Zelinski, Gilewski, & Anthony-Bergstone, 1990). Subjective memory complaints provide useful health information regarding cognitive aging phenomena and also may predict future cognitive decline (Blazer, Hays, Fillenbaum, & Gold, 1997; Christensen, 1991; Rowe & Kahn, 1987; Jonker, Launer, Hooijer, & Lindeboom, 1996; Verhaeghen, Geraerts, & Marcoen, 2000). Complaints are often evaluated with metamemory questionnaires; however, many studies ask only one or two questions about memory problems, such as "Do you have problems with your memory?" (Cutler & Grams, 1988; Schofield, Marder, Dooneief, Jacobs, Sano, & Stern, 1997). The individuals who have participated in memory studies tended to be individuals having memory complaints and problems, perhaps obscuring the relationship between metamemory and memory performance (Gilewski, Zelinski, & Schaie, 1990; Perlmutter, 2001; Ponds & Jolles, 1996; Ponds, Commissaris, & Jolles, 1997). …

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