Janssen, E., Carpenter, D., & Graham, C.A. (2003). Selecting Films for Sex Research: Gender Differences in Erotic Film Preference. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 32, 243-251

By McKay, Alexander | The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, Fall-Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

Janssen, E., Carpenter, D., & Graham, C.A. (2003). Selecting Films for Sex Research: Gender Differences in Erotic Film Preference. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 32, 243-251


McKay, Alexander, The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality


Film dips extracted from commercially available sexually explicit videos are commonly used in research on psychophysiological aspects of sexual arousal and sexual dysfunction. Previous research has found that men and women tend to differ in their responses to sexually explicit films. While men generally have reported greater subjective arousal to sexually explicit films, women's responses vary depending on the nature of the material. For example, in previous studies, women have reported greater arousal to material depicting female-initiated, female-focused sexual activity. The objective of the Janssen, Carpenter, and Graham study was to examine gender differences in sexual responsiveness to sexually explicit films and to identify variables that that influence sexual arousal in men and women.

The study participants were 15 men (mean age = 25.6 years) and 17 women (mean age = 24.0 years) recruited from undergraduate and graduate university classes. To select film clips for the study, a team of male and female graduate students from The Kinsey Institute for Research Sex, Gender and Reproduction screened adult films to select film clips that they personally found to be highly sexually arousing. Seven clips chosen by the women and seven clips chosen by the men plus six other clips (3 male oriented, 3 female oriented) recommended by researchers were included in the study. Each clip was then edited down to 3 minutes (1 minute each of kissing and petting, oral sex, and vaginal intercourse). These 20 clips were then shown in random order to the study participants in private viewing booths. The respondents rated each clip using a 10-point Likert-type scale ranging from 1 (not at all) to 10 (very strongly) on 13 dimensions: the attractiveness of the male and female actors; how sexually arousing, interesting, repulsive they found the clips; to what extent they imagined themselves as a participant and/or as an observer; how much they identified with the male and/or female actors; how much attention they paid to the actors; and how much they liked the setting and sound track.

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Janssen, E., Carpenter, D., & Graham, C.A. (2003). Selecting Films for Sex Research: Gender Differences in Erotic Film Preference. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 32, 243-251
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