A Note from the Editor

By Kaetz, James P. | Phi Kappa Phi Forum, Summer 2003 | Go to article overview

A Note from the Editor


Kaetz, James P., Phi Kappa Phi Forum


IN THIS ISSUE

I am the first to admit that my knowledge of architecture is practically nil. As long as my house has sufficient room, does not leak, and is something that I can afford, I am largely satisfied. It is not that I am a complete Philistine; one cannot earn a PhD in literature and remain ignorant of art and artists and their influence on poetry and fiction. I even vaguely remember having read and, at the time, understood John Ruskin. No, it is more that with my general lack of visual perspicuity (to which I have confessed in the past in this space), I never really had the need or even the chance to study the field. At least when I was an undergraduate, one did not have the opportunity to substitute "Architecture 101" for the world history survey or conversational Spanish. So as Woody Allen says (tongue firmly in cheek) about his own lack of ability to understand the art of pantomime, "I possess an Achilles' heel culturewise that runs up May leg to the back of my neck."

Until now, of course. This issue has been an education for me, and a welcome one to boot. While I still do not claim to know my plinth from my cornice or my Doric from my Ionic, at least now I will be able to stem the rising panic if someone brings the topic up in polite conversation. Our authors offer a broad range of ideas and topics as they take us on a journey through the history, theory, people, and practices of architecture. Their essays are challenging, informative, and insightful. And if they can offer hope to a visual idiot like me, then just think of what they have to offer for those of you who are not quite so design-impaired.

To lead off, Leland Roth offers an overview of the history of American architecture. Professor Roth covers major architectural movements and influences from colonial times to the present in a piece that provides context for the articles that follow in the issue. Next, Georgia Bizios advocates that architects and teachers of architecture build on sound architectural principles rather than following the whims of the moment or copying the models of the past. She suggests a systematic approach to design that involves paying attention to design philosophy, principles, guidelines, and standards.

Robert McCarter then explores what he sees as an overlooked tradition in American architecture, the legacy and relationship of Frank Lloyd Wright and Louis I. Kahn. McCarter discusses the achievements of these two great American architects of the past century, in particular the rarely acknowledged influence that Wright had on Kahn's work. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Note from the Editor
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.