Trainers Know Why Some Dogs Misbehave

By Sharos, David | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 7, 2003 | Go to article overview

Trainers Know Why Some Dogs Misbehave


Sharos, David, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: David Sharos Daily Herald Correspondent

An occasional series on Lisle and Naperville businesses

Mainstream America has embraced the idea of the perfect family consisting of a mom, dad, two kids, the minivan and the dog.

That's all well and good - until reality sets in, especially the dog part. Most canines don't come with a lot of built-in memory. That's where Narnia Pet Behavior and Training can help.

Founded in 1990 by Sally Myers, Narnia offers classes for owners and their pets aimed at establishing appropriate animal behavior and control without using punitive measures.

Myers deals mostly with dogs, but there are some cats, too. She said all training is based on positive behavior modification.

"We never use the word 'no' in our classes because it's too much a part of our everyday vocabulary already," she said. "Our term instead is 'off.' We use positive reinforcement, behavior modification and psychology."

A college graduate with a degree in sociology and psychology, Myers said she began training dogs in her basement as a hobby until it became a passion and took over her life.

Co-owner and work partner Karen Johnson said what started as a modest business with six dogs quickly grew to the point where Narnia has had to move three times in order to provide adequate space for its clients.

The business now is housed in Plainfield.

"We're in our third building now, which is about 4,500 square feet," Johnson said. "We're at the point where we're running about 30 classes a week, with nine dogs per class."

Johnson said two instructors are assigned for each session. The basic program consists of six weeks of training, offering one hour per week, plus a two-hour orientation for owners. The fee is $110, and most folks enroll for three sessions.

"We take dogs from the very beginning, including puppies that may be only 9 or 10 weeks old," Johnson said. "It's easier to work with a dog that is young and can be trained rather than one that has been allowed to do whatever it wants. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Trainers Know Why Some Dogs Misbehave
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.