Defending Rush

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 12, 2003 | Go to article overview

Defending Rush


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

John R. Lott Jr. asks ("Media bias," Op-Ed, Friday) whether it is possible even to discuss race in sports without being called racist. It's not for white conservatives, nor is that limited to sports. Those with short memories forget how liberals claimed Clarence Thomas was elevated to the Supreme Court not because he was qualified, but because he was black.

Judging by the vehement denunciation of Rush Limbaugh's supposedly racist remarks about Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb on ESPN, one would have thought Mr. Limbaugh had called New York "Hymietown," as Jesse Jackson once did, instead of criticizing McNabb's performance, as any sports commentator has a right to do, and saying McNabb gets a break from the media because he is black, as any political commentator has a right to do.

The fact is that other credible sports reporters have uttered almost identical criticisms of McNabb's career, and perhaps we need to look at the career of former New York Times wunderkind Jayson Blair to be reminded of how white liberals often can overlook the deficiencies of blacks they want to succeed in an age in which everyone is equal but some are more equal than others. …

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