United Falls in OT on Penalty Kick

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 12, 2003 | Go to article overview

United Falls in OT on Penalty Kick


Byline: Chris Cowles, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

FOXBORO, Mass. - D.C. United needed just one point to clinch a playoff berth heading into yesterday's game against the New England Revolution, and after 90 minutes it looked like the team would return to the postseason for the first time since 1999.

And yet when the game ended it was the Revolution who earned a spot in the postseason with a 1-0 overtime penalty-kick win. United will have to wait one more game to seal a playoff bid.

"It was tough that it took a goal like that to decide the game," United coach Ray Hudson said. "I had a feeling it might be something like a penalty, a bad bounce or a missed clearance that was going to be the difference."

The result, which thrilled the 12,006 at Gillette Stadium, not only gets the Revolution into the playoffs, but also moves them into third place in the Eastern Conference. It also dropped United to fourth, a point behind New England and six ahead of the last-place Columbus Crew, whom United plays next Sunday.

"That's just the way it goes," Hudson said. "That's the bed we have made for ourselves. We just have to be more balanced and focused in our final two games to put this right."

The injury-plagued Revolution (10-9-9, 39 points) earned the penalty kick only two minutes into the 10-minute sudden death overtime.

United defender Brandon Prideaux was called for taking down Chris Bagley in the box, must to the chagrin of the United players. Marco Etcheverry pleaded with referee Ali Saheli, arguing that Bagley should have been called for a hand ball.

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