GlobalAccess: Associations

By Noordhof, Margaret | Information Today, June 1991 | Go to article overview

GlobalAccess: Associations


Noordhof, Margaret, Information Today


GlobalAccess: Associations includes: National Organizations of the U.S., International Organizations, and Regional, State & Local Organizations. The database contains information on over 80,000 non-profit membership organizations worldwide and is updated semiannually. Approximately 90 percent of the associations included are in the U.S.

The database contains addresses of associations and pithy, yet detailed, descriptions about associations based on information the publisher was able to obtain. Each entry has the following searchable fields: name, address, phone number, officer name, year founded, number of members, number of staff, budget, alternate names, abstract, publications, conventions and meetings, keywords, subject category, and Gale Source Book.

The Gale Source Book refers to the Encyclopedia of Associations included in the database. One can limit searches to any one of these, e.g., International Organizations. Abstracts contain many additional points of information such as number of branches or chapters, computerized services, and affiliations.

Many Powerful Search Options

GlobalAccess: Associations provides a seemingly endless number of ways to search the database, as compared to the printed volumes. The printed version has indexes to keywords from association names, and geographical, executive, and ranking indexes. Printed ranking indexes list associations by membership size, staff size, annual budget, and founding date. In contrast, GlobalAccess: Associations search options are much greater and more powerful.

One of the biggest advantages of a computerized search is that one can combine several search specifications in a single search. For example, one could search for non-U.S. associations that deal with foreign policy, have a membership over 200 and produce a newsletter.

Searching is done using SilverPlatter software, a package which offers a great deal of versatility. As with other SilverPlatter databases, there are options for issuing commands. Use of functions keys is the most efficient option, but if one is not used to them, there is also a command screen in which one can highlight and choose a command, or type in the first letter of a command.

SilverPlatter software offers full Boolean capabilities using the operators AND, OR, and NOT, for text searches, and <, >, and = for numeric searches. Gale Gale GlobalAccess: Associations can be loaded into the SilverPlatter menu along with the other SilverPlatter databases. …

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