RILM Abstracts of Music Literature on CD-ROM

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RILM Abstracts of Music Literature on CD-ROM


National Information Services Corporation (NISC), and the International Repertory of Music Literature at the City University of New York have agreed to produce RILM Abstracts of Music Lieterature as a NISC DISC publication. The CD-ROM is entitled muse--an acronym for MUsic SEarch--and will be updated annually not only with current data from RILM abstracts but also with other databases that complement the material from RLIM. The first issue of muse contains the entire content of RILM Abstrats of Music Literature--over 100,000 records, which occupy some three feet of shelf space in print format. RILM Abstracts, a standard bibliography and index of writings about music, was the obvious first choice to inaugurate muse. NISC's programmers created customized software during the data preparation phase of this project to ensure maximum data recovery from the original files. Careful and extensive programming of this complex database has made this CD-ROM the best, most complete, and most organized version of the RILM Abstrats database available from any source.

RILM Abstracts is the world's most complete continuously updated bibliography of music literature, providing general readers and scholars with easy access to all significant music literature. RILM j offers broad insight into the international music scene, covering books, journals, newsletters, conference proceedings, catalogs, dissertations, and reports of governments and of international bodies. Scholarship from all countries, in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Australia, is fully documented in RILM. …

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