Circuses and Art Museums

By Fogarty, Robert S. | The Antioch Review, Fall 2003 | Go to article overview

Circuses and Art Museums


Fogarty, Robert S., The Antioch Review


We open this issue with a wonderful story by a young writer, Cathy Day, who was born in Peru, Indiana, the winter home of one of America's famous circuses, The Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus. Her story "The Last Member of the Boela Tribe" is a startling work of fiction that reminds one of the darker writings of Mark Twain and Sherwood Anderson. It is, of course, Day's own voice that shines through and we urge you to give it your undivided attention.

Following on from that story we have stories by a recent Whiting Award winner, Jeffery Renard Allen, and by new writers from here and abroad (including another Whiting Award winner, poet Elizabeth Arnold), as well as two pieces of literary criticism, one a sympathetic analysis of post-modernism and the other a look at J.D. Salinger's Nine Stories--published fifty years ago! Additionally there is a touching essay by Thomas Cottle (a long-time contributor) about his mother, a distinguished pianist, and her last concert.

We close the issue with two essays on the state of museums drawn from a series of lectures delivered at Harvard by museum directors. …

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