Hague's Six Appeal; Keep Slogans to That Many Words, He Says

Daily Mail (London), November 15, 2000 | Go to article overview

Hague's Six Appeal; Keep Slogans to That Many Words, He Says


Byline: GRAEME WILSON

WILLIAM Hague has ordered his Shadow Cabinet to think of six - and use no more than that many words to convey their policies to voters.

The Conservative leader has declared that the party's spokesmen - including 'big hitters' such as Michael Portillo and Ann Widdecombe - must start thinking in short, snappy slogans and focusing on their core message.

The six-word limit will cause some flutters of anxiety among MPs who have cut their teeth in a Commons Chamber where long, rambling speeches have a proud tradition.

And history shows that many of the most memorable political quotations required quite a few more words.

But Tory Central Office last night defended the initiative and said it was essential to get the party's message across.

'This will make people concentrate, ' said a senior official last night.

'It will make them think harder about what they are trying to say, what they are trying to tell the voters.' Mr Hague can also point to Baroness Thatcher, who encapsulated some of her most famous beliefs in less than six words.

In 1980 she defended her government's economic policy by declaring 'There is no real alternative' - a phrase which evolved into the famous rallying cry 'There is no alternative. …

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Hague's Six Appeal; Keep Slogans to That Many Words, He Says
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