Models Auction Their Eggs on Internet for $150,000; Outrage over Ethics as Playboy Entrepreneur Puts a (High) Price on 'The Gift of Life'

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), October 24, 1999 | Go to article overview

Models Auction Their Eggs on Internet for $150,000; Outrage over Ethics as Playboy Entrepreneur Puts a (High) Price on 'The Gift of Life'


Byline: WILLIAM LOWTHER;LORRAINE FRASER

GLAMOROUS fashion models are offering themselves as egg donors to infertile women willing to pay as much as [pounds sterling]90,000 in the hope of having a beautiful child.

Eight models have signed up for the genes-for-sale scheme and will be featured on an extraordinary Internet site tomorrow.

The man who seeks to profit from it, Ron Harris, 66, a former horse breeder, playboy film maker and fashion photographer, will auction their eggs to the highest bidder.

'Ron's Angels', as he calls his beautiful girls , are making their 'incredible model eggs' available to anyone who can afford to join in an auction where starting prices range from $15,000 ([pounds sterling]9,000) to $150,000. Bids rise by $1,000 a time.

The price does not include doctors or hospital fees, which could add another [pounds sterling]50,000.

On offer is a choice of cheery redheads, sultry dark-haired beauties and luscious-lipped blondes, all under 30 years old.

One girl, Monica Lewinsky lookalike 'model 117', a single student singer and actress with a 34B bust and 36in hips whose ambition is 'never to be dependent on a man', is inviting minimum bids of $30,000.

Another wants the money to 'support my four-year-old son'. A third 'wants to help others'.

Harris will take 20 per cent on top of the final bid, according to details on the site. The model will get 15 per cent when she begins hormone treatment and the rest when her eggs have been removed.

Harris says he is merely helping 'natural selection' and that his model-egg auction is a natural outgrowth of the urge that people have to mate with genetically superior people and produce babies with evolutionary advantages.

This is particularly true, he says, in a society whose 'celebrity culture' worships beauty.

On the site, www.ronsangels.com, he says: 'Beauty is its own reward.

This is the first society to truly comprehend how important beautiful genes are to our evolution. Just watch television and you will see that we are only interested in looking at beautiful people.' Harris, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, claims: 'Choosing eggs from beautiful women will profoundly increase the success of your children and your children's children.' He adds: 'All eggs are not created equal' and says they should be sold for their 'perceived value'.

But last night critics accused him of simply 'selling human tissue based on Playboy-style sensibilities and Darwinian eugenics' and called for the site to be closed down.

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Models Auction Their Eggs on Internet for $150,000; Outrage over Ethics as Playboy Entrepreneur Puts a (High) Price on 'The Gift of Life'
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