In Tune with Talent; EDUCATION NOTEBOOK

Daily Mail (London), October 12, 1999 | Go to article overview

In Tune with Talent; EDUCATION NOTEBOOK


Byline: SUSAN ELKIN

THE AIM of the primary school is to build the foundations for the complete personality.

There is no complete person without music.' Hungarian composer and music educator Zoltan Kodaly (1882-1967) wrote that, and since the beginning of this term his words have been reverberating musically in three schools in the London Bridge area of the

Borough of Southwark.

In collaboration with the Southwark Festival, which is running in the south-east of the capital, Ilderton Junior, Alma Primary and Surrey Square Junior schools have all signed up to a one-year music teaching and learning programme with The Voices Foundation.

Using a vast repertoire of songs from all over the world, non-specialist teachers in the Southwark schools, as well as in more than 80 schools elsewhere in Britain, are being trained by The Voices Foundation to use music with confidence as part of their daily routine.

If you walk past, you might be taken aback to hear a class register being sung rather than called.

Pupils and teachers might be chatting or greeting each other in song.

Perhaps they'll be singing their times tables.

Children are taught to read music by a series of hand signals base on tonic solfa. Teachers learn to teach children how to use rhythm, pitch and dynamics. The concept of 'tone-deafness' is dismissed as a myth.

'We have been looking for new ways to make music and culture an integral part of the community,

said Michele McLusky, director of Southwark Festival. 'The Voices Foundation project is just a start and what better place to begin than in our junior schools?' The Voices Foundation uses music experts to train teachers. It sends trainers to support teachers in their classrooms and runs workshops and classes for children. It costs less than [pounds sterling]20 per child to set up a Voices Foundation project in a primary school for one year.

WE ALL have a singing voice and we sing in infancy before we speak. The voice is the prime medium for early music education,' explains Susan Digby, founder and principal of The Voices Foundation, who has based her method on what she learned on a Churchill Fellowship in 1991 to study with Peter Erdei at the Kodaly Institute in Kecskemet, Hungary. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In Tune with Talent; EDUCATION NOTEBOOK
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.