Percy Tanks through the Ranks; Answers to Correspondants

Daily Mail (London), March 1, 1999 | Go to article overview

Percy Tanks through the Ranks; Answers to Correspondants


QUESTION

During World War II, how did Percy Hobart achieve a meteoric rise from lance-corporal to general in a single week?

SIR Percy Hobart's 'meteoric' rise was achieved only because he had already made the move in the opposite direction.

Born in 1885, he was commissioned into the Royal Engineers and posted to India with the 1st Bengal Sappers and Miners. In 1923 this talented, outspoken officer was transferred to the Royal Tank Corps and in 1933 promoted Inspector of Britain's Tank Corps.

In 1938, as a major general, he was sent to Egypt to raise the 7th Armoured Division (which became the famous Desert Rats) but Lieutenant General Wilson found him 'self-opinionated and lacking in stability' and said 'he cannot be relied on to discard his own ideas'.

General Wavell relieved him of his command and he retired from active service.

Back in Britain, he joined Gloucestershire's Local Defence Volunteers (soon to become the Home Guard) as a lance corporal and soon became the deputy area organiser. He remained on the Reserve of Officers as a major general.

In September 1940 Churchill was looking for a man to put in charge of tank philosophy and design and General Pike suggested Hobart, with a reminder that he had been sacked.

Taking up his previous rank, Hobart raised and trained the 11th Armoured Division before commanding the 79th Armoured Division from March 1943.

This unit was on the verge of being disbanded when it was converted to the development and training of specialised armoured devices to spearhead the invasion of France.

The 79th Armoured Division played a crucial role in the D-Day landings, deploying specially adapted tanks, developed by Hobart, including 'crabs' (with revolving chains to blow up mines), 'crocodiles' (with flame throwers), AVREs (with heavy mortars to blow up beach defences) and Duplex Drives (with canvas sides designed to 'swim' ashore from landing craft).

Nicknamed 'Hobart's funnies', detailed models of these vehicles can be seen in the National Army Museum.

Hobart (who was General Montgomery's brother-in-law) retired in 1946 and died in 1957.

Julian Humphreys, National Army Museum, Chelsea.

MAJOR General 'Hobo' Hobart's grasp of tank warfare was greatly admired by his Panzer opposition and his feat of training three separate armoured divisions remains unmatched.

Colin McAndrew, Glasgow.

QUESTION

Is the Bible as condemnatory of lesbians as it is of male homosexuals?

SAINT PAUL writes to the church at Corinth (1 Corinthians 6: 9 to10): 'Do you not know that the wicked will not inherit the Kingdom of God? Do not be deceived; neither the sexually immoral nor idolaters nor adulterers nor male prostitutes, nor homosexual offenders, nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards nor slanderers, nor swindlers will inherit the Kingdom of God.' I believe homosexual here means both men and women.

No sin is labelled worse than another. It's the sin that the Bible condemns rather than the person.

A lesbian is not seen as a worse sinner than someone who is greedy.

Timothy Anders, Garston, Liverpool.

THROUGHOUT all the chapters detailing exactly the moral behaviour prescribed for God's people, the Old Testament makes no specific reference to lesbian practice.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Percy Tanks through the Ranks; Answers to Correspondants
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.