Peruvian Herbs Cured My PMS L; SELF - ALTERNIVELY SPEAKING

Daily Mail (London), March 1, 1999 | Go to article overview

Peruvian Herbs Cured My PMS L; SELF - ALTERNIVELY SPEAKING


Byline: DR JOHN BRIFFA

LUCY SOMERSET, 36, from Glasgow, suffered severe pre-menstrual symptoms from when she was a teenager. For up to two weeks each month, Lucy would experience bloating and breast tenderness, coupled with extreme irritability and mood swings.

Over the years, she tried a variety of natural remedies to overcome the problem. While they had some impact, she would still feel incapacitated before each period.

Three months ago, Lucy consulted a medical herbalist, who recommended she try Maca, a little-known remedy for hormone-related problems which grows high up in the Peruvian Andes.

Almost immediately Lucy began to feel the benefit of the remedy, and today she is hardly aware of any pre-menstrual symptoms.

Pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) is a term used to describe a range of symptoms which may be experienced up to two weeks before menstruation.

Common symptoms include fatigue, mood swings, depression, breast tenderness, fluid retention and food cravings. The condition is caused by hormonal changes in the second half of the menstrual cycle.

PMS is thought to affect about a third of women. A small but significant proportion of these women find symptoms severe and troublesome.

Lucy's difficulties with PMS started when she was in her teens. She says: 'For about two weeks each month, I would have some awful physical symptoms and I'd develop a Jekyll and Hyde personality, too. Each month, I would brace myself for what was to come.' Lucy had always had an interest in natural medicine and tried a variety of commonly used remedies for PMS, including evening primrose oil, B complex vitamins and magnesium. 'They helped me but I never felt they were getting to the core of the problem,' she adds.

Lucy finally sought the advice of a medical herbalist, who recommended she try Maca, an extract of a root vegetable used by the Peruvians to treat hormonal imbalance since before the time of the Incas.

Maca is thought to help regulate the production of hormones via the ovaries, and is rich in a range of nutrients including magnesium, zinc and iodine.

Despite its long history of use in South America, it has only recently become available in Britain.

Lucy started to take Maca in tincture form and soon noticed a dramatic improvement in her symptoms.

'Even in the first month, I felt much better,' she says. 'My physical symptoms were less noticeable and my mood much more stable.

'Since then, my PMS has been less and less of a problem, and I am at last beginning to feel like I used to before all of this began.'

MACA is available mail order from the Rio Trading Company, tel. 0181-938 3295.

I AM a fan of South-East Asian and Chinese food.

While I have no problem with Thai and Malaysian dishes, I often feel unwell after eating in a Chinese restaurant. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Peruvian Herbs Cured My PMS L; SELF - ALTERNIVELY SPEAKING
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.