Piped Away for a Song; BAND'S DEMISE LEAVES A SOUR NOTE AS KILTS AND DRUMS ARE SOLD DOWN SOUTH

Daily Mail (London), March 1, 1999 | Go to article overview

Piped Away for a Song; BAND'S DEMISE LEAVES A SOUR NOTE AS KILTS AND DRUMS ARE SOLD DOWN SOUTH


Byline: GARRY MACLEOD

FOR the people of the Highland village of Kingussie, there is nothing more stirring than the sound of pipes and drums.

When their local Badenoch pipe band needed uniforms and instruments, they raised [pounds sterling]20,000 to pay for them.

But now the drums are beating and the kilts are swinging hundreds of miles down south, in the Yorkshire seaside resort of Bridlington.

In Kingussie, villagers are furious that the equipment they paid for has allegedly been sold down south for as little as [pounds sterling]2,500.

'People here are very angry indeed,' said Kingussie community council chairman Sandy Bennett yesterday. 'We travelled all over the country, buying kilts, plaids, bonnets and the like, and we are not happy that they have been purchased for such a small sum.' The Highlanders claim former Badenoch band chairman Martin Campbell, 39, took kilts, ornamental bonnets and drums with him when he moved to England after the band split up, and paid far less than the full value.

Last night Mr Campbell said he had bought only part of the equipment and had paid a fair price for it.

When the Badenoch band split up, all the equipment was put into storage on a local farm owned by the founder member Stuart Gilchrist.

He then moved to Bridlington, as did Mr Campbell. …

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