Telepathy, and the Proof That It Really Is All in the Mind

Daily Mail (London), July 31, 1999 | Go to article overview

Telepathy, and the Proof That It Really Is All in the Mind


Byline: DAVID DERBYSHIRE

BELIEVERS in telepathy are simply indulging in wishful thinking, scientists say.

A major new study into hundreds of mind reading experiments carried out over the past ten years has found no evidence that extra sensory perception really exists.

While many people experience strange and baffling goings on in their lives, almost all can be explained by coincidence, the researchers claim.

Psychologists Dr Richard Wiseman and Dr Julie Milton came to their conclusion after looking at published scientific investigations into telepathy from all over the world.

All 1,200 experiments followed a set of carefully laid down rules, designed to make sure the tests were fair and comparable. After ploughing through the results, they found they were what you would expect from pure chance alone.

Most serious research into telepathy follows a set of rules called the 'Ganzfeld procedure'.

Under these rules volunteers sit on their own in a room listening to neutral white noise through headphones to cut off distracting sounds. Half ping pong balls placed over their eyes and a strong red light stop visual distractions.

In another room a second volunteer is given a picture and told to concentrate. After 20 minutes the first volunteer is shown four pictures and asked to nominate the correct one.

Dr Wiseman, an expert in the paranormal from the University of Hertfordshire found that only 27 per cent of the pictures were correctly identified.

Although this is slightly more than the 25 per cent you would expect from chance, the difference was not statistically significant. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Telepathy, and the Proof That It Really Is All in the Mind
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.