Teachers to Reject Pay Offer

Daily Mail (London), August 26, 1999 | Go to article overview

Teachers to Reject Pay Offer


Byline: ELIZABETH QUIGLEY

SCOTLAND'S second-biggest teaching union has defied Education Minister Sam Galbraith and advised its members to reject a new pay offer.

The Scottish Secondary Teachers' Association, which represents one in six teachers, says the revised offer adds up to a deterioration in working conditions and Mr Galbraith was 'foolish' to represent it as a chance to improve their professional standing.

The union's general secretary, David Eaglesham, also described as 'politically-driven' the reforms central to the [pounds sterling]200million package aimed at creating homework clubs and summer tuition programmes, indicating the gulf between unions and management nine months after the pay talks began.

He said: 'It is foolish of the Scottish Executive to suggest that teachers are rejecting a wonderful opportunity - the offer would do very little to enhance the pay of teachers while worsening their conditions.

'The proposals would mean a considerable extra workload for teachers which would actually take them away from their key role in educating young people.

'The extra hours demanded will end up being filled with politically-driven strategies instead of the pupil-driven work which is presently being undertaken by teachers out with their normal working hours.' The SSTA will put the revised pay offer, worth an average of 15 per cent over three years, to its members early next month, with the result due in three weeks.

But Mr Eaglesham said that since the ballot on a previous offer in April resulted in a 98 per cent rejection, it would be 'no surprise' if his members turned it down. …

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