Do We Need Any More Drugs?

Daily Mail (London), March 28, 1998 | Go to article overview

Do We Need Any More Drugs?


ONE deeply-felt conviction unites the thousands of demonstrators who will be marching through the streets of London today: that the law banning cannabis is an absolute ass.

It may not be a view shared by the Government, but it cannot simply be brushed aside. The protest will show that the campaign to legalise the drug now reaches far beyond the ranks of the young and rebellious.

The marchers will be led by the Labour MP Paul Flynn, supported by a number of prominent European MPs. A liberal broadsheet is giving the campaign its backing. And it's not just the fashionable bien-pensants who think the present law is unworkable. The Mail's Ann Leslie has argued powerfully in this newspaper that cannabis should be decriminalised.

Their case can seem beguiling. The law in this matter is more honoured in the breach than the observance. Academic studies suggest that half of all 16-year-olds have experimented with the drug. Millions of adults have puffed the occasional joint without coming to any noticeable harm. And it is arguable that cannabis is less injurious to health than either alcohol or tobacco.

Yet when all that is said, today's demo still does not deserve to succeed.

Yes, the ban on cannabis may indeed be ineffective. But then, so are the bans on harder drugs such as heroin and cocaine.

There were just 333 registered addicts in 1958. Today the number hooked runs into tens of thousands. Despite police successes - like yesterday's arrest of a Turkish drugs baron - junkies can all too easily find a fix.

But should the law be changed simply because it isn't always obeyed?

Only the most extreme libertarians take the view that hard drugs should be legally available.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Do We Need Any More Drugs?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.