Aliens in Our Midst ?

Daily Mail (London), March 28, 1998 | Go to article overview

Aliens in Our Midst ?


Byline: COLIN WILSON

LAST Saturday, the Mail published a sceptical analysis by JamesDalrymple of the latest British account of alien abduction. The UFOphenomenon has always been controversial. But a distinguished Britishwriter, criminologist and former university professor hasmeticulously examined the principal evidence from around the world.Now Colin Wilson has written a fascinating book about his search.Starting today, with the first part of an intriguing new series,Wilson sifts facts from fiction on his way to an extraordinaryconclusion . . .

to live on the other side of the country with a mistress. Why assume there was anything more to it? In this case, because of something that would happen nearly half a century later.

In 1992, a conference was held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and its subject - amazingly for such a prestigious institution was Alien Abductions: people who were convinced that they had been kidnapped by the occupants of flying saucers.

And one of many 'abductees' who came forward to tell her story was Beth Collings, granddaughter of the man who had disappeared in 1943.

Her father, she said, had also told her how, in 1930, he had been on the beach with his brother. Suddenly, a dense mist rolled in and his brother vanished. Her father walked up and down, calling to the missing man.

Then a shiny object caught his eye, and as he bent to look at it, his brother reappeared.

But, even more strangely, his brother had also been searching frantically up and down the beach believing the other brother had gone missing. And when they arrived home, they found they were several hours late, and their grandmother had sent for the police.

After this, Beth's father admitted, he had experienced many episodes of 'missing time'. In fact, when she was five, Beth had shared one with him.

He had been driving to Doylestown, Pennsylvania, for a business meeting, when the car broke down on a lonely road.

While her father was looking under the bonnet, the car filled with freezing air. When he got back in, the engine started of its own accord, yet her father seemed unsurprised. And when they arrived at Doylestown, they were too late for the meeting.

Although the place where the car had stalled was only a short drive away, they had somehow lost several hours.

WHEN Beth was 14, she experienced all the symptoms of pregnancy - cramps, morning sickness, tender breasts. A doctor confirmed that she was pregnant.

Yet it should have been impossible - Beth was a virgin.

Then, a month or so later, she woke and was no longer pregnant. Moreover, there were no signs of a miscarriage. The doctor was baffled.

Beth later worked on a horse farm with a close friend, Anna Jamerson, and both women experienced the same 'phantom pregnancies', as well as spells of missing time.

On one occasion Beth was driving when she saw dazzling lights in the sky and felt dizzy. Then she found herself eight miles further on, having passed the horse farm. When she arrived back, she found that more than an hour was 'missing'.

Beth not only believed that she was the third generation that had been abducted, but that the same thing was happening to her son and granddaughter.

At the age of four or five, Beth had memories of waking at night and seeing 'catlike beings' at the window - she thought they were cats because they had oval eyes.

The same would happen to her son, Paul, when he was the same age - he would wake in the middle of the night, screaming that cats were looking in the window.

So Beth was shocked when her five-year-old granddaughter drew a flying saucer, with faces looking out of the craft's window, and a small being with catlike eyes, whom she called Nu, who, she said, often took her on journey down a long tunnel.

Beth's son Paul seemed strangely upset by his daughter's drawings and tore them down when she stuck them over her bed.

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