Perfect Partners; Surrey Duo Pull Wobbly England out of the Mire

Daily Mail (London), March 28, 1998 | Go to article overview

Perfect Partners; Surrey Duo Pull Wobbly England out of the Mire


Byline: MIKE DICKSON

reports from Bridgetown Protest: Stewart stayed put ALEC Stewart and Adam Hol-lioake have emerged as a prospective dream ticket to lead England, so their work in perfect tandem yesterday could hardly have been more timely.

Together they established the platform for a final total of 289 for seven that was to prove well beyond the Vice Chancellor's X1 in this solitary warm-up for tomorrow's opening one-day international with the West Indies.

Once Gordon Greenidge and Desmond Haynes had finished taking the Kensington Oval on a joyous romp down memory lane with a century opening stand, they fell away to end up all out 71 runs adrift of a reduced target of 278 in 45 overs.

Playing an eclectic mix of past, present and future talent was always a potential tripwire and when England's full and vice-captain came together, they were flirting with possible embarrassment at 59 for three.

By the time Hollioake departed, 26 overs and 157 runs later for 76, respectability had been restored. With Stewart imperiously going on to pass his 100 on a wicket good and true, Hollioake was, symbolically, the junior partner as he might be if the selectors go with the policy of him taking charge of the one-day squad and his Surrey team-mate the Tests.

Stewart was displeased with his eventual dismissal for a 122-ball 108 in the 43rd over.

After his stumps were demolished as he stepped back to leg against Test all-rounder Franklyn Rose, he stood his ground and claimed that a no-ball should have been given because the minimum four fielders were not in the circle.

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Perfect Partners; Surrey Duo Pull Wobbly England out of the Mire
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