Cuba, Seen through Artists' Eyes

By Perez-Brennan, Tanya | The Florida Times Union, November 7, 2003 | Go to article overview

Cuba, Seen through Artists' Eyes


Perez-Brennan, Tanya, The Florida Times Union


Byline: TANYA PEREZ-BRENNAN, The Times-Union

Imagine yourself walking through the Cuban version of St. Augustine: cobblestone streets, colorful buildings and charm oozing from the city core.

This is Baracoa, the oldest Spanish settlement on Cuba's easternmost point. And you can feel like you're there without ever getting on a plane. Just look at the paintings featured in "Cuban Corner" at four St. Augustine galleries tonight, and you'll be transported to another world.

The Cuban art came about through the St. Augustine-Baracoa Friendship Association, a non-profit, 150-member volunteer organization founded three years ago that runs humanitarian and educational missions.

A large art exhibit, "The Binding of Two Cultures," was shown in June, followed last month by art workshops with Cuban artists. The response has been so positive, said Sali "Soledad" McIntire, secretary of the organization, that they continue to bring the works of more Cuban artists and rotate monthly exhibits in St. Augustine.

In this latest round, new work by Roel Caboverde is included, along with paintings by Luis Eliades, Guillermo Labanino (known professionally as "Piedra") and Leandro Noa.

Caboverde's work, which will hang in Gallery Thirty-Nine, is especially distinctive for its neo-cubist style and renderings of scenes from everyday life.

Three years ago, McIntire approached Len Weeks, St. Augustine's mayor at the time, with the association's idea to do an artist exchange. A trip to Baracoa ensued, and things took off from there.

The Art Association of Baracoa chose the artists for the first exhibit. Since then, McIntire has returned to Cuba numerous times and has chosen work she thought would be appealing to sell here.

"Anytime anyone would come into the gallery, we just went along with people's opinions," McIntire said.

"And you know you like something when you see it," said Deane Kellogg, co-owner of Gallery Thirty-Nine, while looking at Caboverde's work.

In many of the paintings, the people's heads are small and the bodies big. "The hands are big because they work the land," McIntire said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cuba, Seen through Artists' Eyes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.