Keep Goal in Mind When Crafting a Resume

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), August 3, 2003 | Go to article overview

Keep Goal in Mind When Crafting a Resume


Byline: Work Force by The Lane Workforce Partnership For The Register-Guard

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is one in a series of articles about job hunting.

If the last time you updated your resume was before the Ducks or Beavers had a winning football season, you may be wondering where to start.

Your resume is your sales agent. Human-resource directors have limited time and receive many applications. They may take only five to 15 seconds to scan your resume.

How can your resume grab attention?

Before you begin, research your targeted company or industry to determine the appropriate format.

But remember, there is no one set style of resume. At a recent seminar hosted by The Workforce Network in Eugene, three personnel managers discussed what they look for when choosing resumes for interviews. One company preferred resumes on plain white paper so they can be scanned into a database. Government agencies require that an applicant follow pre-established formats and use a resume only as a support document. Creative agencies such as advertising, marketing or public relations look for a touch of personality that makes a candidate stand out.

Many advisors suggest adding an objective statement to a resume to identify the position you are seeking. Such a statement might read: " Strong leader with 20 years supervisory experience seeking management position in manufacturing environment that will utilize my people skills, organizational abilities and industrial experience."

Another example might be: "Seeking a challenging position with a company that would best use my experience in computer programming. This position would include advancement opportunities for an aggressive individual with leadership abilities."

Put key information and credentials at the top of the resume. If an advanced degree is required for the job, note your advanced degree toward the top of the page. If special skills are needed, list them in a summary before listing work experience.

Your work history will highlight what sets you apart from others. …

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Keep Goal in Mind When Crafting a Resume
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