Clifford Vernon Reed Sr

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 22, 2003 | Go to article overview

Clifford Vernon Reed Sr


Clifford Vernon Reed Sr. of St. Charles

A funeral service for Clifford Vernon Reed Sr., 85, will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, at the Norris Funeral Home, 100 S. Third St., St. Charles. Born Aug. 13, 1918, in Jefferson, Okla., the son of Mege and Flossie (nee Sayre) Reed, he died Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2003, at his home. Burial with military honors will be in Union Cemetery, St. Charles. Clifford was raised on a farm in Grant County, Okla. He graduated from Jefferson High School in 1936 and Tonkawa Junior College in 1938. He was working for Douglas Aircraft when he began his military service in 1943. During World War II, Clifford served in the Army as a platoon sergeant in the 1st Battalion of the 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. He earned two Purple Hearts, and was awarded the Bronze Star during combat action in the Philippines. After hostilities ceased, Platoon Sgt. Reed was a member of the first U.S. military unit to enter Tokyo. When Clifford was discharged from the Army after World War II, he returned to Oklahoma to farm. Experience on the local school board lead him to return to college for a degree in education. While farming, he commuted 90 miles a day for two years to attend classes at Northwestern College in Alva, Okla, from which he graduated in 1956. He quit farming and began a 26-year career in education, serving in a variety of roles. Among these were superintendent of schools for three separate districts: Offerle, Argonia and Wamego, all in Kansas. He married his wife, Una, in June of 1967. Una also was an educator, having taught for 39 years. They shared a passion for family, teaching children, fishing and travel. …

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