The First World War

History Today, November 2003 | Go to article overview

The First World War


Bert Frandsen studies the American 1st Pursuit Group in Ha in the Ring: The Birth of the American Air Power in the Great War (Smithsonian Books, $32.95).

Hugh Strachan's The First World War (Simon and Schuster, 25 [pounds sterling]) is a riveting illustrated narrative, including rare colour photographs, of the war by this leading scholar.

Commentary from the historian Charles Messenger accompanies World War One in Colour: The Definitive Illustrated History with over 200 Remarkable Full Colour Photographs (Ebury Press, 20 [pounds sterling]). Original photographs have been converted into colour, the overall effect lends a sense of immediacy to photographs we are accustomed to viewing in black and white.

Thomas Fleming offers a critical examination of the policies taken by Woodrow Wilson during the Great War in The Illusion of Victory: Americans in World War I (The Perseus Group, 22 [pounds sterling]).

The Rape of Belgium (New York University Press, $29.95,) by Larry Zuckermann is an in-depth analysis of the atrocities committed in Belgium during the First World War.

The First War (Dorling Kindersley, 25 [pounds sterling]) by a military historian, H.R. Willmott, is an accessible and moving account of the Great War, using timeliness, maps and thematic panels to guide the reader through the events of the War.

Voices from the Great War (Random House, 8.99 [pounds sterling]) is a vivid depiction by the critically acclaimed novelist and writer Peter Vansittart of the way in which a variety of people--politicians, poets, soldiers and music-hall singers among them--experienced the First World War

Gordon Corrigan's Mud, Blood ant Poppycock: Britain and the First World War (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 20 [pounds sterling]) offers a witty and revisionist history of Britain and the Great War

John H. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The First World War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.